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Table 1 Particularly high melatonin levels reported for several edible and medicinal plants (selected examples).

From: Melatonin, a potent agent in antioxidative defense: Actions as a natural food constituent, gastrointestinal factor, drug and prodrug

Species Tissue Melatonin [ng/g] References
(A) Edible plants    
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) fruit 0.5 [18]
Raphanus sativus (red radish) root tuber 0.6 [19]
Brassica campestris (Japanese radish) stem, leaves 0.6 [19]
Brassica nigra (black mustard) seed 129 [24,28]
Brassica hirta (white mustard) seed 189 [24,28]
Prunus cerasus (tart cherry, Montmorency) fruit 15–18 [23,24]
Prunus amygdalus (almond) seed 39 [28]
Pimpinella anisum (anise) seed 7 [24,28]
Foeniculum vulgare (fennel) seed 28 [24,28]
Helianthus annuus (sunflower) seed 29 [24,28]
Oryza sativa (rice) seed 1 [19]
Zea mays (Indian corn) seed 1.3 [19]
Avena sativa (oat) seed 1.8 [19]
Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue) seed 5 [19]
Elettaria cardamomum (green cardamom) seed 15 [24,28]
Zingiber officinale (ginger) tuber 0.5 [19]
Musa paradisiaca (banana) fruit 0.5 [18]
(B) Officinal plants    
Melissa officinalis (balm mint) young plant 16 [25]
Scutellaria baicalensis (huang-qin) plant > 2,000 – > 7,000 [24,25,27]
Pimpinella peregrina (-) dried root 38 [25]
Hypericum perforatum (St. Johns wort) leaf 1,750 [27]
Hypericum perforatum (St. Johns wort) flower > 2,400 – > 4,000 [25,27]
Lippia citriodora (lemon verbena) young plant 22 [25]
Tanacetum parthenium (feverfew) leaf (fresh/dried) > 1,300/> 7,000 [24,25,27]