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Table 9 Prediction of fat fraction from body density for Caucasian + Black + Hispanic subjects.

From: Physiological models of body composition and human obesity

Subjects a b f0 f1 d0 d1 MSRls MSRsiri1 MSRsiri2 MSRbro
Male: 18 – 89 4.751 4.345 0.109 0.644 1.0667 0.952 .000528 .00180 .000702 0.00148
Male: 18 – 31 5.046 4.625 0.094 0.65 1.0693 0.9566 .000441 .00166 .000835 0.00161
Male: 32 – 50 4.674 4.274 0.13 0.65 1.061 0.949 .000502 .00192 .000675 .00156
Male: 51 – 89 4.332 3.938 0.132 0.65 1.064 0.944 .000567 .00185 .000572 .00121
Female:18–90 4.796 4.378 0.193 0.736 1.049 0.938 .000703 .00114 .00163 .000926
Female:18–31 4.907 4.482 0.19 0.767 1.050 .935 .000677 .00101 .00132 .000935
Female:32–50 4.913 4.492 0.19 0.73 1.049 .941 .000591 .00104 .00143 .000831
Female:51–90 4.726 4.311 0.22 0.68 1.043 .947 .000793 .00129 .00196 .000999
  1. The parameters a and b are the optimal least square values (fat fraction = a/density – b), and f0 and f1 are the fat fractions used for the determination of d0 and d1 from the values of a and b. The mean square residual error for the least square fit (MSRls), the Siri Model I (MSRsiri1, eq. (13)) and Model II (MSRsiri2, eq. (14)) and the Brozek model (MSRbro, eq. (10)) are also listed.