30). The obese group had lower EE (p < 0.05) during each time period and over the entire 22-hours (p < 0.05), in comparison to their lean counterparts. Conclusion The EMTAC proved to be a valuable tool for metabolic measurements in monkeys. The accuracy and sensitivity of the instrument allowed detection of subtle metabolic changes in relation to energy intake. Moreover, there is an association between a reduction of energy expenditure and a gain in body weight."/>
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Table 3 Anthropometrics, energy metabolism and nutrient utilization in those monkeys who were classified as "lean" or "obese" according to their modified BMI.

From: Energy expenditure in chow-fed female non-human primates of various weights

  Lean Obese
Number of monkeys 5 6
Body weight (kg) 4.2 ± 0.6 6.9 ± 1.1 *
Age (years) 8.9 ± 1.6 14.7 ± 4.9 *
Modified BMI (kg/crown rump, m2) 21.7 ± 0.8 36.0 ± 4.3 *
22-hour energy intake (kcal/kg) 55.7 ± 45.2 23.4 ± 15.6
22-hour energy expenditure (kcal/kg) 54.8 ± 6.5 40.5 ± 3.0*
Day period energy expenditure (kcal/kg) 22.2 ± 2.1 16.9 ± 1.4*
Dark period energy expenditure (kcal/kg) 27.1 ± 3.9 19.8 ± 1.4*
Morning energy expenditure (kcal/kg) 5.5 ± 0.6 3.9 ± 0.5*
22-hour respiratory quotient (VCO2/VO2) 0.83 ± 0.05 0.82 ± 0.05
Day period respiratory quotient (VCO2/VO2) 0.81 ± 0.05 0.81 ± 0.03
Dark period respiratory quotient (VCO2/VO2) 0.83 ± 0.08 0.82 ± 0.08
Morning respiratory quotient (VCO2/VO2) 0.84 ± 0.09 0.82 ± 0.07
  1. * = Significant (p < 0.01) between lean and obese monkeys