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Table 3 Body weight adjusted intestinal characteristics of rats switched from control, high fiber or high protein weaning diets to a high fat, sucrose diet in adulthood

From: Consumption of diets high in prebiotic fiber or protein during growth influences the response to a high fat and sucrose diet in adulthood in rats

Parameter Control High Fiber High Protein
  Male Female Male Female Male Female
Liver Weight (mg/g) 21.6 ± 0.3 21.2 ± 0.7 21.3 ± 0.7 23.3 ± 0.7 23.2 ± 0.8 20.4 ± 0.7
Stomach Weight (mg/g) 4.9 ± 0.5 4.8 ± 0.3 4.2 ± 0.1 5.4 ± 0.3 4.2 ± 0.2 5.2 ± 0.3
Small Intestine Length (mm/g) 2.09 ± 0.04a 3.27 ± 0.01a 2.31 ± 0.03b 3.63 ± 0.01b 2.01 ± 0.04a 3.19 ± 0.01a
Small Intestine Weight (mg/g) 11.2 ± 0.2a 16.2 ± 0.3a 12.9 ± 0.3b 16.5 ± 0.3b 12.2 ± 0.2b 15.7 ± 0.3a
Colon Length (mm/g) 0.32 ± 0.01 0.38 ± 0.03a 0.36 ± 0.01 0.60 ± 0.03b 0.32 ± 0.01 0.52 ± 0.03ab
Colon Weight (mg/g) 2.5 ± 0.1a 3.4 ± 0.2a 3.3 ± 0.2b 4.2 ± 0.2b 2.6 ± 0.1a 3.4 ± 0.2a
Empty Cecum Weight (mg/g) 1.2 ± 0.1a 2.0 ± 0.2a 2.7 ± 0.2b 3.3 ± 0.2b 1.3 ± 0.1a 1.7 ± 0.2a
  1. Values are mean ± SE with control (n = 9 M; n = 9 F); high fiber (n = 10 M; n = 10 F); and high protein (n = 10 M; n = 10 F). There was a significant diet effect (p < 0.01) for small intestine length and weight, colon length and weight, and cecum weight as determined with two-factor ANOVA. There was a significant sex effect (p < 0.01) for small intestine length and weight, colon length and weight, stomach weight, and cecum weight as determined by two-way ANOVA. There was a significant diet by sex effect for colon length (p = 0.008). Values with different letters are significantly different (p < 0.05) within males or females.