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Table 2 Association of urinary iodine with elevation of UACR and reduction of eGFR

From: Iodine nutrition status and its association with microvascular complications in urban dwellers with type 2 diabetes

Urinary iodine Adequate Low More than adequate Excessive
High UACR
 Prevalence,% 24.4 27.5 24.6 24.2
 Odds Ratio
  Model 1 1.0 (Ref.) 1.17 (1.02–1.36)* 1.01 (0.80–1.28) 0.99 (0.74–1.32)
  Model 2 1.0 (Ref.) 1.17 (1.01–1.38)* 0.95 (0.73–1.23) 0.97 (0.70–1.34)
Reduced eGFR
 Prevalence, % 4.9 6.5 3.3 7.8
 Odds Ratio
  Model 1 1.0 (Ref.) 1.35 (1.03–1.79)* 0.67 (0.38–1.16) 1.67 (1.03–2.70)*
  Model 2 1.0 (Ref.) 1.17 (0.86–1.58) 0.67 (0.36–1.22) 1.48 (0.85–2.58)
DKD
 Prevalence, % 26.2 29.8 26.2 28.5
 Odds Ratio
  Model 1 1.0 (Ref.) 1.19 (1.04–1.37)* 1.00 (0.79–1.26) 1.12 (0.85–1.48)
  Model 2 1.0 (Ref.) 1.17 (1.01–1.37)* 0.93 (0.72–1.21) 1.13 (0.83–1.54)
  1. Data are expressed as odds ratios (95%CI). Logistic regression analyses were used for the association of urinary iodine with elevation of UACR, reduction of eGFR and DKD. *P < 0.05
  2. Model 1 was unadjusted
  3. Model 2 was adjusted for age, sex, education, current smokers, BMI, HbA1C, duration of diabetes, dyslipidemia, TSH and FT4
  4. High UACR was defined as UACR ≥30 mg/g, reduced eGFR as eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2, and DKD as UACR > 30 mg/g or eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2
  5. Urinary iodine concentrations: low, < 100 μg/L; adequate, 100 to < 200 μg/L; more than adequate, 200 to < 300 μg/L; excessive, ≥300 μg/L