Skip to main content

Table 4 Association between the number of metabolic abnormalities and irregular breakfast consumption, using negative binomial regression

From: Association between breakfast skipping and metabolic outcomes by sex, age, and work status stratification

  Odds Ratio (95% Confidence Interval) referred regular breakfast group in each category
Total participants (n = 21,193) 1.05 (1.01–1.08)
 Men (n = 9022) 1.11 (1.06–1.15)
  Younger aged Men (n = 3065) 1.14 (1.06–1.23)
  Middle aged Men (n = 5957) 1.08 (1.03–1.14)
 Women (n = 12,171) 1.02 (0.98–1.07)
  Younger aged Women (n = 4254) 1.06 (0.96–1.17)
  Middle aged Women (n = 7917) 1.01 (0.96–1.07)
Non-working population (n = 11,796) 1.05 (1.00–1.10)
 Men (n = 4527) 1.07 (1.01–1.14)
  Younger aged Men (n = 1066) 1.12 (0.97–1.29)
  Middle aged Men (n = 3461) 1.04 (0.97–1.12)
 Women (n = 7269) 1.06 (1.00–1.12)
  Younger aged Women (n = 2177) 1.09 (0.96–1.25)
  Middle aged Women (n = 5092) 1.06 (0.99–1.13)
Working population (n = 9397) 1.05 (1.00–1.10)
 Men (n = 4495) 1.14 (1.08–1.21)
  Younger aged Men (n = 1999) 1.15 (1.03–1.27)
  Middle aged Men (n = 2496) 1.12 (1.04–1.20)
 Women (n = 4902) 0.99 (0.92–1.06)
  Younger aged Women (n = 2077) 1.03 (0.90–1.18)
  Middle aged Women (n = 2825) 0.96 (0.89–1.05)
  1. All models are adjusted for age, educational level, income level, smoking, alcohol drinking, and physical activity
  2. Bolds are indicated statistical significance. (p-value < 0.05)
  3. Younger population is 20–39 years old
  4. Middle-aged population is 40–59 years old